The Ultimate Essential Oils Guide

Abigail Scott

Essential oils have gained a cult-like following in recent years, however, the practice of using these plant-based extracts for a variety of healthful purposes isn’t exactly new. For centuries, aromatic plant byproducts - like leaves, stems, roots, and flowers - have been a focal point in baptisms, embalmings, and everything that falls between. 


Since modern America has fallen in love with essential oils, the scented products have essentially (see what we did there?) taken off. At Pit Liquor, we’re big fans of our fragrant friends. We put them in everything we make! Not only do they smell amazing, but they have medicinal properties created by nature herself. Here, we’ll share the most common essential oils and their respective uses. Print this out and stick it in your meditation nook next to your Mala beads and World Market floor cushion. 

What are essential oils? 

Essential oils are not deemed “essential” because we simply can’t attain mindfulness or clarity without them. They capture the essence of the plant - or its pleasing aroma. To get all science-y for you, what we deem “essential oils” are in fact the metabolic secretions of plants - aka plant hormones, aka what brings all the pollinators to the yard.


To get the juice, you’ve got to squeeze. Obtaining a plant’s “essence” or its scent can be done in a host of different ways - cold pressing, distillation, wax embedding, expression, and more. Because essential oils are so potent, they are most often mixed with a carrier oil for topical application. 

What are the most common essential oils?

  • Lavender. She’s the bell of the ball in our opinion. Lavender smells so delightful, is instantly relaxing, and comes from a gorgeous purple flower. Many use lavender essential oils in aromatherapy, during meditation, yoga, and for stress relief. Lavender essential oil can also be added to laundry, room diffusers, natural cleaning solutions, and more. Basically, anytime you want to feel like you’re naked in a flower field in southern France, go with lavender. 
  • Peppermint. Ancient societies including those of Rome, Greece, and Egypt, used peppermint to quell headaches, relieve cold symptoms, and minimize body aches. While we decided to ditch some less desirable elements of antiquity, like gladiatorial arenas and the heart-burn-inducing practice of eating while laying down, humans have continued to use peppermint essential oil for a variety of healing purposes.
  • Rose. Like lavender, rose essential oil just smells so damn good. It’s an elegant aroma that doesn’t overwhelm the senses. Rose evokes light, bright feelings of springtime, and is actually used in aromatherapy practices to relieve stress and boost moods. Some studies show that rose essential oil can fight acne, hydrate the skin, and minimize the appearance of scars and wrinkles. 
  • Sandalwood. In Ayurvedic medicine, sandalwood combats a host of mental and physical problems. Using sandalwood essential oil through aromatherapy practices or topical applications may significantly reduce stress, increase libido, fight fatigue, and improve focus.
  • Cedarwood. Besides transporting one to a thick pine forest, cedarwood aids in minimizing the effects of many skin conditions, including eczema, inflammation, and bacterial infections. When mixed with a base oil and applied topically to the scalp, cedarwood may prevent further hair loss and sooth itchy, irritable scalps.
  • Lime and orange. These citrus fruits may be celebrated sidekicks in the artisanal cocktail world, but in fact, the essential oil derived from lime and orange peels have noteworthy health properties. High concentrations of vitamin C make each powerful antiseptic that may be used to treat gum infections. Orange and lime essential oil is also used in skincare as a brightening agent that helps reduce the appearance of sunspots, scars, and discoloration. 

Pit Liquor’s natural deodorants smell so wonderful thanks to essential oils. Pamper your pits with fresh smelling products, instead of chemical components that our competitors love to use. Mother Nature is pretty much perfect, we don’t need to reinvent the wheel.

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